Sunday, October 24, 2010

Boaz

There was something about her that reminded him of his mother, Rahab. Rahab had hid the spies in Jericho because she believed in the stories she had heard about the God of the Isrealites. He had heard her first hand account of how the spies gave her a red cord to mark her house to spare her during the invasion, how the army of the Lord marched around the walls of the city and how the Lord caused the walls come down. Although his mother made a living from prostitution, she left all of that behind to begin a new life with the God of Isreal.

Rahab always told him how she met his father, and how his family welcomed her into their family even though she wasn't from their people. His grandfather, Nahshon, was especially attentive and kind towards her as well as his grand-aunt and uncle, Elisheba and Aaron. His mother's quick thinking and faith had been a catalyst towards a great victory and miracle by God! But his mother was always different. She had much to learn about the Law and the ways of their people, so the family was very patient in teaching her everything she needed to know.

He had heard much about Ruth--she had a good reputation even before she entered Bethlehem, as travelers on the road had witnessed about how Ruth meticulously and tenderly looked after Naomi. Naomi probably would have died without her. Boaz felt badly, that perhaps he could have sent servants to meet them and bring them home. But by the time he had heard they were coming, they already had arrived in town and settled in Elimelech's old house. Ruth also acted quickly by coming to work this morning, he thought. Boaz was impressed with her diligence and wisdom. His mother would have liked Ruth very much, if she were alive today.

Before the mid-day break and meal, he glanced towards the field where he instructed Ruth to stay with his female workers. Not only did she heed his words, she was smiling as she labored under the sun. That one, he surmised, will have no shortage of suitors. She will be married in a very short time. The thought made him happy and strangely sad at the same time.

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